Yet another easier than pie fermentation experimentation – preserved lemons.

This requires just two ingredients – lemons and kosher salt. While traditionally Meyer lemons are used, I’ve found the garden variety grocery store lemons (4-5 per pint jar) are more than adequate. Scrub the lemons well, soak for a few minutes in a vinegar/water solution then rinse again. And then:

  1. Put a tbsp of kosher salt into the bottom of a sterilized pint sized jar
  2. Slice off the ends of each lemon then cut into quarters without cutting all the way through (keep the base intact)
  3. Gently open up each lemon and rub a tsp of salt on the pulp
  4. Stuff lemons into the jar as you go, leaving 1/2″ of headroom at the top
  5. Sprinkle another tbsp of salt on top then seal the jar
  6. Let the jar sit at room temperature (out of sunlight) for three days; a few times a day give the jar a shake and rotate it (upside down, then right side up)
    — If the juice doesn’t cover the lemons after the first day, add additional fresh squeezed lemon juice to cover
  7. After 3 days, put the lemons in the refrigerate, giving it a shake every so often to distribute juice and salt

The lemons will be ready when the rinds are soft (about 3 weeks). To use, peel off the pulp and wash the rind (to get rid of the surface salt).

Now, how to use these delicious aromatic bursts of concentrated lemon?  Add to soups and stews such as this delicious Moroccan tagine, grain salads like this, salad dressings and more.

And on a sunny Sunday afternoon, what could be be better than a salty collins (made with preserved lemons, of course)!

Pre-Preserved Lemon

As happens every year, winter finally arrived which meant the real absolute final end of the growing season for warm weather vegetables and herbs. Arugula, chard and kale – you guys keep growing while we focus on preserving your less hardy brethren.

This photo shows some of my favorite ways to preserve the harvest which include drying, brining, canning, fermenting, and freezing:

  • Lacto-fermentation (red and green cabbage sauerkraut, Kim-Chi)
  • Brined cucumbers (aka pickles)Preservation Nov14
  • Hot packed tomatoes (and a bowl of soon-to-be frozen yellow tomato sauce)
  • Dried peppers, oven roasted/dehydrated cherry tomatoes
  • Herbed vinegar
  • Drying purple basil, lemon verbena, bowl of thyme/oregano/Mexican tarragon
  • Not sure whether it is rooting or pre-drying – green pepper basil

Take your pick of processes and produce – these are all quick and simple ways to enjoy summer’s bounty during cold winter months.